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Hey guys I have been sanding my dart with a 5" da air sander, after about a hour of sanding water starts to spit out of the port of the sander, and the water is flying all over my bare metal, and also the water reduces the speed of the sander. I have drained the tank on the compressor and I have a filter on the compressor. How can I stop the water? Thanks Darren
 

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hey darren ,that can also be a sign of you overworking your compressor.it all has to do with cfm and psi.air sanders ,buffers,grinders,etc. eat up alot of air over working your compressor and causing it to sweat.you might be able eliminate some of your problem by doing what dart said.if you had a compressor that is pushing say 24.0 [email protected] 175 psi that's a pretty healthy compressor.(probably 7 hp 80 gallon 2 stage)you wouldn't have that problem.but that's about $1600.00 bucks .that's why i'm stuck with my little craftsman.try giving you compressor frequent small brakes.let it catch up.it'll help.good luck
carl
 

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add a 50 ft hose before the seperator. coil it up or whatever. i have my compressor in my attic of the garage, i have a 50ft hose coiled up going from the compressor to the drop down pipe mounted to my wall where i have an on off valve with a T going to the seperator, regulator, and chuck with a small trap in the pipe which catches a lot of water too. dont use quick connectors, they will add too much restriction. just screw the hose into the compressor and screw it into the regulator. you might get some water in the line but your trap will catch A LOT of water like this. also if you spray, you can crack the drain on the seperator. the air has to cool before going into the seperator. i used ot have the same problem, the seperator would hardly ever have any water in it. you can also try one of those automatic drains. theyre cheap.
 
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Sharpe recommends at least 25 foot of pipe straight up from your compressor. Then I suggest at least 40 more feet of black pipe. You need to cool the air after its been through the pipe. Your air gets heated when compressed and naturally makes moisture. I have a kick butt compressor and air line set up and I still get tons of water out of it. Then only true way to do it is to get an aftercooler. But that would be unreasonable for the hobbiest. Run wd-40 through your tools when your done otherwise it will gum them up. I actually don't suggest you oil them with air tool oil if you have a moisture problem, it will gum them worse. WD will cut the moisture and let them stay free.
 
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Didn't find any aftercoolers on that site??? If I was to get an aftercooler on mine it would be a few thousand bucks as my compressor puts out so much heat it gets the pressure regulator hot to the touch after 40+ feet of black pipe. For a smaller compressor a genaric may work but for mine it would not be able to handle the conditions. Plus my garage isn't big enough!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
jamesdart I put the filter 50 feet after the compressor and then another 25 feet of hose. Worked pefect , just drain the fiter every now and then, "no water". Thanks Man. Darren
 

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When plumbing your air lines, always pull your air from the top af the air line. if you create an elbow put a dump there. Other wise let it run down hill to another dump.Boiler drains are cheap and work well. build your own aftercooler out of copper pipe ( or black iron if you must) My after cooler is made of .75" copper tubing run in a diamond pattern three diamonds deep about 4' tall with a dump (boiler drain) at the bottom of each pass. The pipes are bolted to a concrete wall in a shaded insulated compressor room. after that it runs down hill about 50' buried in the ground in clear core water pipe using insty tights. Then another dump buried in the ground outside the shop in a box ( an old paint gun cleaner with a stainless steel lid , insulated.) After that I plumb into the shop Pulling from the top of the air line again into a filter and water trap inside the shop. The filter inside the shop has yet to see any signs of water. I got the copper tubing real cheap at a hardware stores' going out of buisness sale. Got the clear core cheap from a local plumber. The instytights aren't cheap $27 each. Instytights let you go from the clear core plastic pipe to a pipe fitting. Works for me and yes I am anal. P.S. I do not recommend shutting the air on and off at the air compressor during long breaks or even for ever for that matter when using the plastic line. I just let the compresser bleed off and build back up on its own as to avoid a shock to the piping. Been working for 3 years with no problems. DO NOT EVER USE PVC for air lines. I Worked in a shop that used schedule #80 p.v.c. for air lines and experienced some horrific failures . Life threatening. Sword like shardes hurling through doors, walls, ceilings, tearing off light fixtures etc.. Lucky no one was hurt.
 

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I used 3/4 copper pipe and fittings, same stuff used to plumb water line in a house. It's been in place for 15 years with no problems.


mike.
 

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black iron gas pipe, 1/2". for now, i have a 3/8" 50' hose going from my 26 gal compressor to the pipe up in the attic. when i finish my big compressor, im going with a 1/2" or 3/4" hose to the hard line.
 

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Cool. I have about a 30' section of 1/2" black iron, then to the regulator and water separator. After the that, then 50' of 3/8 rubber line. I was wondering if going to 1/2" rubber line would be worth anything. Things seem to be working just fine, so I will more than likely just let it go.
 
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