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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i want to put the alterktion in my dart but i was told my" stainless steel brake" set would'nt work.I was told i needed the mustang type set up,is anyone running the alterktion with the stainless steel brakes?
 

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i dont have an alterktion, but the spindles are mustang II spindles. you have to use the brake kit that was made for a mustang II
 

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he designed it with mustang II spindles so it would be more versatile - there are more brake kits available and they are cheaper that way. wheel size doesnt depend on brake size. give Mr Reilly a call - he's always good to talk to. if you wanted to, you could easily sell a-body brakes on the board here. good luck with your project. -Evan
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Good question that deserves a re-visit I think.
First and most importantly, the Mopar spindles are designed for rear steer. The steering arms angle inward at the rear, so the wheel mounting surface is designed close to the steering axis. In a front steer, the steering arms have to angle outward. If you use the Mopar spindles and redesign a proper steering arm, it will be into the rotor, preventing you front using brakes. There are lots of systems out there fab'd this way, but the steering geometry is pretty shaky for anything but strip use.
That's the prime reason for using some other spindle - geometry suffers terribly. Some other reasons are that the Mopar spindles are also heavy, at around 10lbs each, and to use them with custom steering arms, it would be about $200 more because of the added machine work and quantities required.

As far as choosing what spindle would do the best job, the choice was simple. The "Mustang II" spindle is used by 10 jillion street rods, and aftermarket support is massive. It's the only spindle on the planet that you can call ANY brake manufacturer, and they will have every possible combination for. No other spindle is that popular, so brake kit choices become much more limited if you use something else. The spindles I use are aftermarket forged steel pieces, which we then modify a little bit - they aren't really Ford spindles, that's just the shape of them. They're a pretty rugged spindle, and every company out there makes brake kits for it - from cheapo kits using 11" granada rotors, up to $3000 kits with 15" rotors and 6 piston calipers. Any of these kits are off-the-shelf, so I didn't have to design expensive brake kits - they're already available with a part number.

To put it simply, concerning your kit from SSBC, no it won't fit. But SSBC DOES make many different kits that fit the MII spindle - all the spindles are just shapes to build around - the various Mopar kits have hubs and bearings and caliper brackets that fit those particular shapes, while the MII kit has parts to fit that particular shape - the calipers are all the same, just the mating parts differ. Of course, the SSBC kits have one-piece rotors, so the only part that crosses over would be the caliper - it would be 3/4 the cost again to convert over. It'd be cheaper to sell the kit outright and buy another one. The Wilwood kits have separate hubs, so we convert those kits over for about half the cost of a new kit, but it's still pricey to do.

In the end, you're out of luck with it, which I always hate to say, but given the factors involved, and the expense of custom-made parts these days, I had no choice but to use the MII spindle.

I would like to point out that the suspension is definitely NOT Mustang II - the design and geometry is pure custom, inherent only to the alterktion - a few common parts were used, but the MII suspension used in street rods is a whole different animal.
 
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