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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm confused. I am a retired radio station engineer and navy electronics technician, and have a pretty good grasp of how most automotive
electronics components work. However, I cannot find a satisfactory answer to a question about my alternator and voltage regulator.
The car is My 64ragtop Dart GT, with a '74 (I think) 318. It was originally a slant six car, but the previous owner had it upgraded.
It has the later isolated field alternator, with one feild terminal grounded to use the older wiring harness. The voltage regulator is an
old style two terminal one, but a solid-state replacement, not the original equipment electromechanical one.

Ma MOPAR changed the alternator and regulator to the isolated field and flat pack components for a reason! The component changes
don't seem like cost cutting moves, so I'm thinking that they must have intended some increased performance with the changes. Losing the
point-type electromechanical regulator is one thing, and that was accomplished by the P.O. of my car with the replacement solid state
regulator.

I've seen articles on "upgrading" the charging system which show the isolated field (sometimes called "dual field") alternator and the "flat pack"
regulator, along with the wire connector that some of the articles say are hard to find (but are available from Bouchillon Performance).
All of that said, my question is this:

What benefit would I gain from the addition of the flat pack regulator??? It's a simple change, done by un-grounding the presently grounded
alternator field and adding one wire and the connector and regulator, but what's the benefit over what I have?
 

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Damn, the only guy I knew that could have answered this question died last year. My generator service company had an in house starter and alternator shop. The guy who worked for me had this job for 60 years. Now, I hate buying a starter or alternator because I don't trust anyone else's work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
FM indeed, Jim! I could see the problem with the old point style electromechanical regulator. Once it was replaced with a fast switching electronic one, in the same case, with the same connectors, the only difference I could see between the post '70 style "flat pack" and what I have is like the difference in placing a valve on one end or the other of a pipe. In this case, that is controlling the supply side or the ground side. No effective difference, the field coils are in series! I just thought I might be overlooking something blindingly obvious. It wouldn't be the first time!

tnku BC
 

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I'm guessing that it has to do with remote voltage sensing, maybe? The later alternators had higher amp output ratings and would benefit from it. The early setups definitely did not have that option...
 

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Maybe someone can answer a related question. I converted to electronic ignition, and bought the MP electronic voltage regulator for the early style alternator. The catalogue says it is for racing use only. I am running it on my street/strip car. Am I going to damage something with street use?
 

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No, you won't damage anything. I won't use that regulator anymore because they don't last well. The Wells replacement from Auto Zone seems to be a better product for less money.

There are lots of parts listed as "for race use only" that have nothing to do with emissions, but to make them "street legal" must be "tested". Using the "race use only" tag allows them to sell the product and not have any legal problems if the product winds up in a street car.



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Jim_Lusk said:
No, you won't damage anything. I won't use that regulator anymore because they don't last well. The Wells replacement from Auto Zone seems to be a better product for less money.

There are lots of parts listed as "for race use only" that have nothing to do with emissions, but to make them "street legal" must be "tested". Using the "race use only" tag allows them to sell the product and not have any legal problems if the product winds up in a street car.
This makes a lot of sense...I know for a fact that a lot of aftermarket parts for my motorcycles are labeled "Race Only" and I always wondered why, as they were really not related to emission controls or anything like that...

It's always about the bottom line, isn't it..? ;D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Unrelated trivia question for ya, Mike: What's the mouse's name at the ship's wheel. I mean the real original name, not the one he evolved into.

Anyone???

;D

BC
 

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64ragtop said:
Unrelated trivia question for ya, Mike:  What's the mouse's name at the ship's wheel.  I mean the real original name, not the one he evolved into.

Anyone???

;D

BC
Steamboat Willy?
 

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absolutely correct! giv
ski said:
64ragtop said:
Unrelated trivia question for ya, Mike: What's the mouse's name at the ship's wheel. I mean the real original name, not the one he evolved into.

Anyone???

;D

BC
Steamboat Willy?
absulutely correct!
Whats he win BC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
69 GTS Clonvertible said:
absolutely correct! giv
ski said:
64ragtop said:
Unrelated trivia question for ya, Mike: What's the mouse's name at the ship's wheel. I mean the real original name, not the one he evolved into.

Anyone???

;D

BC
Steamboat Willy?
absulutely correct!
Whats he win BC.
My heartfelt congratulations. and condolences on being old enough to remember the actual title of the very early Disney cartoon..
 
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